You can head to the great outdoors, for free, courtesy of the Palm Springs Public Library

You can use your library card to check out one of the 10 California Library Parks Passes available at the Palm Springs Public Library.

We all know the library is so much more than just a place to check out books, and now it’s the gateway to the great outdoors!

The gist: You can use your library card to check out one of the 10 California Library Parks Passes available at the Palm Springs Public Library. The pass will let you visit State Parks for free.

Driving the news: The pass is part of an effort to make the outdoors more accessible, particularly for people of color or low-income communities who are less likely to have access to nature. 

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  • With these passes, kids and adults alike will benefit from an increase in physical activity and the reduction in stress that comes just from being in nature.
     
  • This is all thanks to a pilot program started in April by the California State Library, California State Parks, and the First Partner’s Office.

Find your state park: California has some of the most jaw-dropping natural wonders in the country, and with this pass, you get access to 200 participating state park units operated by California State Parks.

Details, details: The passes can be checked out for two weeks and offer free vehicle day-use entry.

  • Each pass is valid for entry of one passenger vehicle with a capacity of nine people or less or one highway-licensed motorcycle. 

  • The pass is valid any day of the week, including holidays, if space is available

For more information, check the website here.

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