Council set to discuss more stringent rent control measures at next meeting

City leaders want to address the cost of rent here, but a request to move up discussion of the proliferation of vacation rental permits does not currently appear on the next meeting agenda.

We first told you about the rapid increase in rent in Palm Springs and throughout the Coachella Valley earlier this year. Now it looks like officials in the city want to establish more stringent rules around rent control.

The news: At its next regular meeting — scheduled for Thursday July 28 at 5:30 p.m. — the Palm Springs City Council is set to discuss an urgent “rent stabilization ordinance.”

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  • The ordinance would add more teeth to state laws which limit annual rent increases on buildings 15 years old or older to either 10% or 5% plus the local consumer price index, whichever is lower.

Why it matters: Rent control already exists through the state’s Tenant Protection Act, which went into place in 2020. That act, however, allows rent hikes twice per year. The Palm Springs rules would allow a rent increase only once each year.

  • Under the ordinance being considered, landlords would also be allowed to appeal the rental increase limitations in the city — something the state doesn’t offer.

But wait: One factor many claim adds to the housing affordability crisis in the city is the proliferation of short term vacation rentals in the city.

  • Earlier this month, Mayor Lisa Middleton asked that city staff move up discussion of a possible moratorium on vacation rental licenses to the July 28 meeting.

  • However, that discussion does not currently appear on the Council agenda for the meeting here.

Dive deeper by reading the proposed ordinance here.

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